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The Ballad of Reading Gaol by Oscar Wilde.

reading gaol

Title: The Ballad of Reading Gaol.
Author: Oscar Wilde.
Genre: Non-fiction, literature, poetry, political dissent, social criticism.
Country: U.K.
Language: English.
Publication Date: February 13th, 1898.
Summary: Wilde had been incarcerated in Reading Gaol after being convicted of homosexual offenses in 1895 and sentenced to two years' hard labour in prison. During his imprisonment, he witnessed a hanging of Charles Thomas Wooldridge, a trooper in the Royal Horse Guards, who was convicted of cutting the throat of his wife. The poem narrates the execution of Wooldridge and moves from an objective story-telling to symbolic identification with the prisoners as a whole. The poem highlights the brutalization of the punishment that all convicts share.

My rating: 10/10.
My Review:


♥ I never saw a man who looked
With such a wistful eye
Upon that little tent of blue
Which prisoners call the sky,
And at every drifting loud that went
With sails of sliver by.

♥ I only knew what hunted thought
Quickened his step, and why
He looked upon the garish day
With such a wistful eye;
The man had killed the thing he loved,
And so he had to die.

Yet each man kills the thing he loves,
By each let this be heard,
Some do it with a bitter look,
Some with a flattering word.
The coward does it with kiss,
The brave man with a sword!

Some kill their love when they are young,
And some when they are old;
Some strangle with the hands of Lust,
Some with the hands of Gold:
The kindest use a knife, because
The dead so soon grow cold.

Some love too little, some too long,
Some sell, and others buy;
Some do the deed with many tears,
And some without a sigh:
For each man kills the thing he loves,
Yet each man does not die.

♥ But why he said so strange a thing
No warder dared to ask:
For he to whom a watcher's doom
Is given as his task,
Must set a lock upon his lips
And make his face a mask.

Or else he might be moved, and try
To comfort or console:
And what should Human Pity do
Pent up in Murderer's Hole?
What word of grace in such a place
Could help a brother's soul?

♥ We were as men who through a gen
Of filthy darkness grope:
We did not dare to breathe a prayer,
Or to give our anguish scope:
Something was dead in each of us,
And what was dead was Hope.

For Man's grim Justice goes its way,
And will not swerve aside:
It slays the weak, it slays the strong,
It has a deadly stride:
With iron heel it slays the strong,
The monstrous parricide!

♥ And all the woe that moved him so
That he gave that bitter cry,
And the wild regrets, and the bloody sweats,
None knew so well as I:
For he who lives more lives than one
More deaths than one must die.

♥ But there were those amongst us all
Who walked with downcast head
And knew that, had each got his due,
They should have died instead:
He had but killed a thing that lived,
Whilst they had killed the dead.

For he who sins a second time
Wakes a dead soul to pain,
And draws it from its spotted shroud,
And makes it bleed again,
And makes it bleed great bouts of blood,
And makes it bleed in vain!

♥ The Chaplain would not kneel to pray
By his dishonoured grave:
Nor mark it with that blessed Cross
That Christ for sinners gave,
Because the man was one of those
Whom Christ came down to save.

♥ This too I know - and wise it were
If each could know the same -
That every prison that men build
Is built with bricks of shame,
And bound with bars lest Christ should see
How men their brothers maim.

♥ But though lean Hunger and green Thirst
Like asp with adder fight,
We have little care of prison fare,
For what chills and kills outright
Is that every stone one lifts by day
Becomes one's heart by night.

♥ And thus we rust Life's iron chain
Degraded and alone:
And some men curse, and some men weep,
And some men make no moan:
But God's eternal Laws are kind
And break the heart of stone.

...Ah! happy they whose hearts can break
And peace of pardon win!
How else may man make straight his plan
And cleanse his soul from Sin?
How else but through a broken heart
May Lord Christ enter in?
Tags: 1890s, 19th century - poetry, 1st-person narrative, british - poetry, literature, my favourite books, oscar wilde, philosophy, poetry, political dissent, social criticism
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