Margot (midnight_birth) wrote in margot_quotes,
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midnight_birth
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The Road to Oz by L. Frank Baum (illustrated by John R. Neill). (1/2)

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Title: The Road to Oz: In Which Is Related How Dorothy Gale of Kansas, The Shaggy Man, Button Bright, and Polychrome the Rainbow's Daughter Met on an Enchanted Road and Followed it All the Way to the Marvelous Land of Oz.
Author: L. Frank Baum (illustrated by John R. Neill).
Genre: Fiction, literature, children's lit, fantasy.
Country: U.S.
Language: English.
Publication Date: 1909.
Summary: In order to help the lovable, ever-wandering Shaggy Man, Dorothy and Toto must journey through magical and mysterious lands. Soon the three are joined by a lost lad named Button-Bright and the beautiful young Polychrome the Rainbow's Daughter. With magic at work and danger about, these new friends must journey through cities of talking beasts, across the Deadly Desert into the Truth Pond, and through many other strange and incredible places before they can reach the Emerald City. Along the way, Dorothy and her companions encounter a whole new assortment of fantastic and funny characters--the crafty King Dox of Foxville, the magical donkey King Kik-a-bray, the terrible bigheaded Scoodlers, and Johnny Dooit (who can do anything)--along with old friends Jack Pumpkinhead, Tik-tok, Billina, and, of course, the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow, and the wonderful Wizard himself.

My rating: 8.5/10
My review:



yiz

♥ Indeed, the wishes of my little correspondents have been considered as carefully as possible, and if the story is not exactly as you would have written it yourselves, you must remember that a story has to be a story before it can be written down, and the writer cannot change it much without spoiling it.

~~from Preface.

♥ "That’s it, Shaggy Man."

"I’m much obliged, miss," he said, and started along another road.

"Not that one!" she cried; "you’re going wrong."

He stopped.

"I thought you said that other was the road to Butterfield," said he, running his fingers through his shaggy whiskers in a puzzled way.

"So it is."

"But I don’t want to go to Butterfield, miss."

"You don’t?"

"Of course not. I wanted you to show me the road, so I shouldn’t go there by mistake."

"Oh! Where do you want to go to, then?"

"I’m not particular, miss."

This answer astonished the little girl; and it made her provoked, too, to think she had taken all this trouble for nothing.

"There are a good many roads here," observed the shaggy man, turning slowly around, like a human windmill.

"Seems to me a person could go 'most anywhere, from this place."

♥ "These roads are all strange—and what a lot of them there are! Where do you suppose they all go to?"

"Roads," observed the shaggy man, "don’t go anywhere. They stay in one place, so folks can walk on them."

♥ "I’m 'fraid, Shaggy Man," she said, with a sigh, "that we’re lost!"

"That’s nothing to be afraid of," he replied, throwing away the core of his apple and beginning to eat another one.

♥ "Have an apple," suggested the shaggy man, handing her one with pretty red cheeks.

"I’m not hungry," said Dorothy, pushing it away.

"But you may be, to–morrow; then you’ll be sorry you didn’t eat the apple," said he.

"If I am, I’ll eat the apple then," promised Dorothy.

"Perhaps there won’t be any apple then," he returned, beginning to eat the red–cheeked one himself.

♥ Dorothy sat down, too, very thoughtful. The little girl had encountered some queer adventures since she came to live at the farm; but this was the queerest of them all. To get lost in fifteen minutes, so near to her home and in the unromantic State of Kansas, was an experience that fairly bewildered her.

ngcgc

The shaggy man searched in one pocket, carefully; and in another pocket; and in a third. At last he drew out a small parcel wrapped in crumpled paper and tied with a cotton string. He unwound the string, opened the parcel, and took out a bit of metal shaped like a horseshoe. It was dull and brown, and not very pretty.

"This, my dear," said he, impressively, "is the wonderful Love Magnet. It was given me by an Eskimo in the Sandwich Islands—where there are no sandwiches at all—and as long as I carry it every living thing I meet will love me dearly."

"Why didn’t the Eskimo keep it?" she asked, looking at the Magnet with interest.

"He got tired being loved and longed for some one to hate him. So he gave me the Magnet and the very next day a grizzly bear ate him."

"Wasn’t he sorry then?" she inquired.

"He didn’t say," replied the shaggy man, wrapping and tying the Love Magnet with great care and putting it away in another pocket. "But the bear didn’t seem sorry a bit," he added.

"Did you know the bear?" asked Dorothy.

"Yes; we used to play ball together in the Caviar Islands. The bear loved me because I had the Love Magnet. I couldn’t blame him for eating the Eskimo, because it was his nature to do so."

♥ "Let’s take the seventh road," he suggested. "Seven is a lucky number for little girls named Dorothy."

"The seventh from where?"

"From where you begin to count."



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♥ He looked up at her calmly. His face was round and chubby and his eyes were big, blue, and earnest.

"I’m Button–Bright," said he.

"But what’s you real name?" she inquired.

"Button–Bright."

"That isn’t a really–truly name!" she exclaimed.

"Isn’t it?" he asked, still digging.

"'Course not. It’s just a—a thing to call you by. You must have a name."

"Must I?"

"To be sure. What does your mamma call you?"

He paused in his digging and tried to think.

"Papa always said I was bright as a button; so mamma always called me Button–Bright," he said.

"What is your papa’s name?"

"Just Papa."

"What else?"

"Don’t know."

"Never mind," said the shaggy man, smiling. "We’ll call the boy Button–Bright, as his mamma does. That name is as good as any, and better than some."

Dorothy watched the boy dig.

"Where do you live?" she asked.

"Don’t know," was the reply.

"How did you come here?"

"Don’t know," he said again.

"Don’t you know where you came from?"

"No," said he.

"Why, he must be lost," she said to the shaggy man. She turned to the boy once more.

"What are you going to do?" she inquired.

"Dig," said he.

"But you can’t dig forever; and what are you going to do then?" she persisted.

"Don’t know," said the boy.

"But you must know something," declared Dorothy, getting provoked.

"Must I?" he asked, looking up in surprise.

"Of course you must."

"What must I know?"

"What’s going to become of you, for one thing," she answered.

"Do you know what’s going to become of me?" he asked.

"Not—not 'zactly," she admitted.

"Do you know what’s going to become of you?" he continued, earnestly.

"I can’t say I do," replied Dorothy, remembering her present difficulties.

The shaggy man laughed.

"No one knows everything, Dorothy," he said.

"But Button–Bright doesn’t seem to know anything," she declared. "Do you, Button–Bright?"

He shook his head, which had pretty curls all over it, and replied with perfect calmness:

"Don’t know."

.."Have you ever been to sea?" asked Dorothy.

"To see what?" answered Button–Bright.

"I mean have you ever been where there’s water?"

"Yes," said Button–Bright; "there’s a well in our back yard."

"You don’t understand," cried Dorothy. "I mean, have you ever been on a big ship floating on a big ocean?"

"Don’t know," said he.

"Then why do you wear sailor clothes?"

"Don’t know," he answered, again.

Dorothy was in despair.

"You’re just awful stupid, Button–Bright," she said.

"Am I?" he asked.

"Yes, you are."

"Why?" looking up at her with big eyes.

She was going to say: "Don’t know," but stopped herself in time.

♥ "Well," said the shaggy man, "let’s start on, or we won’t get anywhere before night comes."

"Where do you expect to get to?" asked Dorothy.

"I’m like Button–Bright; I don’t know," answered the shaggy man, with a laugh. "But I’ve learned from long experience that every road leads somewhere, or there wouldn’t be any road; so it’s likely that if we travel long enough, my dear, we will come to some place or another in the end. What place it will be we can’t even guess at this moment, but we’re sure to find out when we get there."

"Why, yes," said Dorothy; "that seems reas’n’ble, Shaggy Man."

kajajajajaja


,N,N,N,N


♥ Before long they saw ahead of them a fine big arch spanning the road, and when they came nearer they found that the arch was beautifully carved and decorated with rich colors. A row of peacocks with spread tails ran along the top of it, and all the feathers were gorgeously painted. In the center was a large fox’s head, and the fox wore a shrewd and knowing expression and had large spectacles over its eyes and a small golden crown with shiny points on top of its head.

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♥ "Don’t ask so many questions, little boy."

"Why?"

"Ah, why, indeed?" exclaimed the captain, looking at Button–Bright admiringly. "If you don’t ask questions you will learn nothing. True enough. I was wrong. You’re a very clever little boy, come to think of it—very clever indeed."

♥ Once through the opening they found a fine, big city spread out before them, all the houses of carved marble in beautiful colors. The decorations were mostly birds and other fowl, such as peacocks, pheasants, turkeys, prairie–chickens, ducks, and geese. Over each doorway was carved a head representing the fox who lived in that house, this effect being quite pretty and unusual.

♥ "I humbly beg to report that I found these strangers on the road leading to your Foxy Majesty’s dominions, and have therefore brought them before you, as is my duty."

"So—so," said the King, looking at them keenly. "What brought you here, strangers?"

"Our legs, may it please your Royal Hairiness," replied the shaggy man.

"What is your business here?" was the next question.

"To get away as soon as possible," said the shaggy man.

♥ "Never mind," said the little girl, thoughtfully. "There isn’t so much to see in Kansas as there is here, and I guess Aunt Em won’t be very much worried; that is, if I don’t stay away too long."

fox



ouz

♥ "Button–Bright, those curls and blue eyes do not go well with so much wisdom. They make you look too youthful, and hide your real cleverness. Therefore, I will do you a great favor. I will confer upon you the head of a fox, so that you may hereafter look as bright as you really are."

As he spoke the King waved his paw toward the boy, and at once the pretty curls and fresh round face and big blue eyes were gone, while in their place a fox’s head appeared upon Button–Bright’s shoulders—a hairy head with a sharp nose, pointed ears, and keen little eyes.

"Oh, don’t do that!" cried Dorothy, shrinking back from her transformed companion with a shocked and dismayed face.

"Too late, my dear; it’s done. But you also shall have a fox’s head if you can prove you’re as clever as Button–Bright."

.."Please, please change him back again, your Majesty!" begged Dorothy.

King Renard IV shook his head.

"I can’t do that," he said; "I haven’t the power, even if I wanted to. No, Button–Bright must wear his fox head, and he’ll be sure to love it dearly as soon as he gets used to it."

.."A sailor suit and a fox head do not go well together," said one of the maids; "for no fox was ever a sailor that I can remember."

"I’m not a fox!" cried Button–Bright.

"Alas, no," agreed the maid. "But you’ve got a lovely fox head on your skinny shoulders, and that’s almost as good as being a fox."

The boy, reminded of his misfortune, began to cry again. Dorothy petted and comforted him and promised to find some way to restore him his own head.

niz

♥ When they met the shaggy man in the splendid drawing–room of the palace they found him just the same as before. He had refused to give up his shaggy clothes for new ones, because if he did that he would no longer be the shaggy man, he said, and he might have to get acquainted with himself all over again.

♥ "Don’t mention Aesop to me, I beg of you!" exclaimed King Dox. "I hate that man’s name. He wrote a good deal about foxes, but always made them out cruel and wicked, whereas we are gentle and kind, as you may see."

"But his fables showed you to be wise and clever, and more shrewd than other animals," said the shaggy man, thoughtfully.

"So we are. There is no question about our knowing more than men do,' replied the King, proudly. 'But we employ our wisdom to do good, instead of harm; so that horrid Aesop did not know what he was talking about."

♥ Dorothy wondered why the animals living in Foxville did not wear just their own hairy skins, as wild foxes do; when she mentioned it to King Dox he said they clothed themselves because they were civilized.

"But you were born without clothes," she observed, "and you don’t seem to me to need them."

"So were human beings born without clothes," he replied; "and until they became civilized they wore only their natural skins. But to become civilized means to dress as elaborately and prettily as possible, and to make a show of your clothes so your neighbors will envy you, and for that reason both civilized foxes and civilized humans spend most of their time dressing themselves."

"I don’t," declared the shaggy man.

"That is true," said the King, looking at him carefully: "but perhaps you are not civilized."

fiz

♥ A little girl, radiant and beautiful, shapely as a fairy and exquisitely dressed, was dancing gracefully in the middle of the lonely road, whirling slowly this way and that, her dainty feet twinkling in sprightly fashion. She was clad in flowing, fluffy robes of soft material that reminded Dorothy of woven cobwebs, only it was colored in soft tintings of violet, rose, topaz, olive, azure, and white, mingled together most harmoniously in stripes which melted one into the other with soft blendings. Her hair was like spun gold and floated around her in a cloud, no strand being fastened or confined by either pin or ornament or ribbon.

piriz

.."Who are you, dear?" she asked, gently.

"I’m Polychrome," was the reply.

"Polly whom?"

"Polychrome. I’m the Daughter of the Rainbow."

akkakakaka


donkiz







karapiz

♥ "It’s filled with stupid beasts of some sort, but we mustn’t be afraid of 'em 'cause they won’t hurt us."

"All right," said Button–Bright; but Polychrome didn’t know whether it was all right or not.

♥ Suddenly, as they were about to boldly enter through the opening, there arose a harsh clamor of sound that swelled and echoed on every side, until they were nearly deafened by the racket and had to put their fingers to their ears to keep the noise out.

It was like the firing of many cannon, only there were no cannon–balls or other missiles to be seen; it was like the rolling of mighty thunder, only not a cloud was in the sky; it was like the roar of countless breakers on a rugged seashore, only there was no sea or other water anywhere about.

They hesitated to advance; but, as the noise did no harm, they entered through the whitewashed wall and quickly discovered the cause of the turmoil. Inside were suspended many sheets of tin or thin iron, and against these metal sheets a row of donkeys were pounding their heels with vicious kicks.

The shaggy man ran up to the nearest donkey and gave the beast a sharp blow with his switch.

"Stop that noise!" he shouted; and the donkey stopped kicking the metal sheet and turned its head to look with surprise at the shaggy man.

akaraka

♥ These big words delighted the donkeys, and made them bow to the shaggy man with great respect. Said the grey one:

"You shall be taken before his great and glorious Majesty King Kik–a–bray, who will greet you as becomes your exalted stations."

"That’s right," answered Dorothy. "Take us to some one who knows something."

dunkapiz

"Oh, we all know something, my child, or we shouldn’t be donkeys," asserted the grey one, with dignity. "The word 'donkey' means 'clever,' you know."

"I didn’t know it," she replied. "I thought it meant 'stupid'."

"Not at all, my child. If you will look in the Encyclopedia Donkaniara you will find I’m correct. But come; I will myself lead you before our splendid, exalted, and most intellectual ruler."

All donkeys love big words, so it is no wonder the grey one used so many of them.

♥ The houses were not set in rows, forming regular streets, but placed here and there in a haphazard manner which made it puzzling for a stranger to find his way.

"Stupid people must have streets and numbered houses in their cities, to guide them where to go," observed the grey donkey, as he walked before the visitors on his hind legs, in an awkward but comical manner; "but clever donkeys know their way about without such absurd marks. Moreover, a mixed city is much prettier than one with straight streets."

Dorothy did not agree with this, but she said nothing to contradict it.

♥ "Don’t they go to school?" asked Dorothy.

"All donkeys are born wise," was the reply, "so the only school we need is the school of experience. Books are only fit for those who know nothing, and so are obliged to learn things from other people."

"In other words, the more stupid one is the more he thinks he knows," observed the shaggy man.

♥ "I’ll see if his magnificent Majesty King Kik–a–bray is at home," said he. He lifted his head and called 'Whee–haw! whee–haw! whee–haw!' three times, in a shocking voice, turning about and kicking with his heels against the panel of the door. For a time there was no reply; then the door opened far enough to permit a donkey’s head to stick out and look at them.

It was a white head, with big, awful ears and round, solemn eyes.

araka

♥ This polite speech pleased the King very much; indeed, it pleased him so much that it proved an unlucky speech for the shaggy man. Perhaps the Love Magnet helped to win his Majesty’s affection as well as the flattery, but however this may be the white donkey looked kindly upon the speaker and said:

"Only a donkey should be able to use such fine, big words, and you are too wise and admirable in all ways to be a mere man. Also I feel that I love you as well as I do my own favored people, so I will bestow upon you the greatest gift within my power—a donkey’s head."

As he spoke he waved his jeweled staff. Although the shaggy man cried out and tried to leap backward and escape, it proved of no use. Suddenly his own head was gone and a donkey head appeared in its place—a brown, shaggy head so absurd and droll that Dorothy and Polly both broke into merry laughter, and even Button–Bright’s fox face wore a smile.

"Dear me! dear me!" cried the shaggy man, feeling of his shaggy new head and his long ears. "What a misfortune—what a great misfortune! Give me back my own head, you stupid king—if you love me at all!"

"Don’t you like it?" asked the King, surprised.

"Hee–haw! I hate it! Take it away—quick!" said the shaggy man.

apiz

"But I can’t do that," was the reply. "My magic works only one way. I can do things, but I can’t un do them. You’ll have to find the Truth Pond, and bathe in its water, in order to get back your own head. But I advise you not to do that. This head is much more beautiful than the old one."

"That’s a matter of taste," said Dorothy.

♥ "But I can’t help it, my dear; my donkey head wants to bray continually," he replied. "Doesn’t your fox head want to yelp every minute?" he asked Button–Bright.

"Don’t know," said the boy, still staring at the shaggy man’s ears. These seemed to interest him greatly, and the sight also made him forget his own fox head, which was a comfort.

dinkiphiz

♥ "Hee–haw! I declare!" exclaimed the King. "It seems each one of you wants a different food. How queer all living creatures are, except donkeys!"

"And donkeys like you are queerest of all," laughed Polychrome.

"Well," decided the King, "I suppose my Magic Staff will produce the things you crave; if you are lacking in good taste it is not my fault."

♥ At daybreak there was a dreadful noise throughout the city. Every donkey in the place brayed. When he heard this the shaggy man woke up and called out "Hee–haw!" as loud as he could.

mizkara

♥ Perhaps no one ever beheld a more strangely assorted group than the one which now walked along the road, through pretty green fields and past groves of feathery pepper–trees and fragrant mimosa. Polychrome, her beautiful gauzy robes floating around her like a rainbow cloud, went first, dancing back and forth and darting now here to pluck a wild–flower or there to watch a beetle crawl across the path. Toto ran after her at times, barking joyously the while, only to become sober again and trot along at Dorothy’s heels. The little Kansas girl walked holding Button–Bright’s hand clasped in her own, and the wee boy with his fox head covered by the sailor hat presented an odd appearance. Strangest of all, perhaps, was the shaggy man, with his shaggy donkey head, who shuffled along in the rear with his hands thrust deep in his big pockets.

pireiz

None of the party was really unhappy. All were straying in an unknown land and had suffered more or less annoyance and discomfort; but they realized they were having a fairy adventure in a fairy country, and were much interested in finding out what would happen next.








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♥ Presently they saw a little fat man sitting on a bench before the door. He wore a red, braided jacket that reached to his waist, a blue waistcoat, and white trousers with gold stripes down the sides. On his bald head was perched a little, round, red cap held in place by a rubber elastic underneath his chin. His face was round, his eyes a faded blue, and he wore white cotton gloves. The man leaned on a stout gold–headed cane, bending forward on his seat to watch his visitors approach.

Singularly enough, the musical sounds they had heard seemed to come from the inside of the fat man himself; for he was playing no instrument nor was any to be seen near him.

mizik

.."Why, he’s a reg’lar musicker!" said Button–Bright.

"What’s a musicker?" asked Dorothy.

"Him!" said the boy.

.."Stop it!" cried the shaggy man, earnestly. "Stop that dreadful noise!"

The fat man looked at him sadly and began his reply. When he spoke the music changed and the words seemed to accompany the notes. He said—or rather sang:

It isn’t a noise that you hear,
But Music, harmonic and clear.
My breath makes me play
Like an organ, all day—
That bass note is in my left ear.


"How funny!" exclaimed Dorothy; "he says his breath makes the music."

"That’s all nonsense," declared the shaggy man; but now the music began again, and they all listened carefully.

My lungs are full of reeds like those
In organs, therefore I suppose,
If I breathe in or out my nose,
The reeds are bound to play.

So, as I breathe to live, you know,
I squeeze out music as I go;
I’m very sorry this is so——
Forgive my piping, pray!


"Poor man," said Polychrome; "he can’t help it. What a great misfortune it is!"

"Yes," replied the shaggy man; "we are only obliged to hear this music a short time, until we leave him and go away; but the poor fellow must listen to himself as long as he lives, and that is enough to drive him crazy. Don’t you think so?'

"Don’t know," said Button–Bright. Toto said "Bow–wow!" and the others laughed.

"Perhaps that’s why he lives all alone," suggested Dorothy.

"Yes; if he had neighbors they might do him an injury," responded the shaggy man.

♥ "I don’t quite understand that," said Polychrome, with a puzzled look; "but perhaps it’s because I’m accustomed only to the music of the spheres."

"What’s that?" asked Button–Bright.

"Oh, Polly means the atmosphere and hemisphere, I s’pose," explained Dorothy.

misik

"I wear no band around me,
And yet I am a band!
I do not strain to make my strains
But, on the other hand,
My toot is always destitute
Of flats or other errors;
To see sharp and be natural are
For me but minor terrors.


.."Music hath charms, and it may
Soothe even the savage, they say;
So if savage you feel
Just list to my reel,
For sooth to say that’s the real way.
"

..Said Dorothy:

"I don’t know how good his poetry is, but it seems to fit the notes, so that’s all that can be 'xpected."

♥ ..the boy asked this long question:

"If I swallowed a mouth–organ, what would I be?"

"An organette," said the shaggy man.

.."You’ve given me an idea, Button–Bright; I believe the musicker must have swallowed an accordeon in his youth."

mizk

♥ "Do you know," asked the Rainbow’s Daughter, "if this is the right road to the Emerald City?"

"No, I don’t," replied Dorothy; "but it’s the only road in this part of the country, so we may as well go to the end of it."

♥ They moved forward a little faster to see what the dog was barking at, and found perched upon a point of rock by the roadside a curious creature. It had the form of a man, middle–sized and rather slender and graceful; but as it sat silent and motionless upon the peak they could see that its face was black as ink, and it wore a black cloth costume made like a union suit and fitting tight to its skin. Its hands were black, too, and its toes curled down, like a bird’s. The creature was black all over except its hair, which was fine, and yellow, banged in front across the black forehead and cut close at the sides. The eyes, which were fixed steadily upon the barking dog, were small and sparkling and looked like the eyes of a weasel.

niriz

The thing gave a jump and turned half around, sitting in the same place but with the other side of its body facing them. Instead of being black, it was now pure white, with a face like that of a clown in a circus and hair of a brilliant purple. The creature could bend either way, and its white toes now curled the same way the black ones on the other side had done.

"It has a face both front and back," whispered Dorothy, wonderingly; "only there’s no back at all, but two fronts."

♥ "Who are you?"

"Scoodlers!" they yelled in chorus, their voices sharp and shrill.

"What do you want?" called the shaggy man.

"You!" they yelled, pointing their thin fingers at the group; and they all flopped around, so they were white, and then all flopped back again, so they were black.

"But what do you want us for?" asked the shaggy man, uneasily.

"Soup!" they all shouted, as if with one voice.

phizzzzz

..Happening just then to feel the Love Magnet in his pocket, he said to the creatures, with more confidence:

"Don’t you love me?"

"Yes!" they shouted, all together.

"Then you mustn’t harm me, or my friends," said the shaggy man, firmly.

"We love you in soup!" they yelled, and in a flash turned their white sides to the front.

"How dreadful!" said Dorothy. "This is a time, Shaggy Man, when you get loved too much."

♥ With this he began to march along the road to the opening in the rocks ahead, and the others kept close behind him. But the Scoodlers closed up in front, as if to bar their way, and so the shaggy man stooped down and picked up a loose stone, which he threw at the creatures to scare them from the path.

hara

At this the Scoodlers raised a howl. Two of them picked their heads from their shoulders and hurled them at the shaggy man with such force that he fell over in a heap, greatly astonished. The two now ran forward with swift leaps, caught up their heads, and put them on again, after which they sprang back to their positions on the rocks.




kakakaka


♥ One head struck Toto, who first yelped and then grabbed the head by an ear and started running away with it.

akapiz

♥ One funny thing about the Scoodlers was they could walk in either direction, coming or going, without turning around; because they had two faces and, as Dorothy said, 'two front sides,' and their feet were shaped like the letter T upside down. They moved with great rapidity and there was something about their glittering eyes and contrasting colors and removable heads that inspired the poor prisoners with horror, and made them long to escape.

♥ Button–Bright, holding Dorothy’s hand in one chubby fist and Polly’s hand in the other, was so affected by this shout that he began to cry again, repeating the protest:

"Don’t want to be soup, I don’t!"

"Never mind," said the shaggy man, consolingly; "I ought to make enough soup to feed them all, I’m so big; so I’ll ask them to put me in the kettle first."

"All right," said Button–Bright, more cheerfully.

♥ For the Queen of the Scoodlers proved to be much more dreadful in appearance than any of her people. One side of her was fiery red, with jet–black hair and green eyes and the other side of her was bright yellow, with crimson hair and black eyes. She wore a short skirt of red and yellow and her hair, instead of being banged, was a tangle of short curls upon which rested a circular crown of silver—much dented and twisted because the Queen had thrown her head at so many things so many times. Her form was lean and bony and both her faces were deeply wrinkled.

akapiz

♥ "I’m going to fight for our lives,' he whispered to the children, 'for if I fail we will be no worse off than before, and to sit here quietly until we are made into soup would be foolish and cowardly."

♥ When this had been secretly done little Polychrome, dancing near to the guard, suddenly reached out her hand and slapped his face, the next instant whirling away from him quickly to rejoin her friends.

kakaka

♥ Then the shaggy man turned around and faced his enemies, standing just outside the opening, and as fast as they threw their heads at him he caught them and tossed them into the black gulf below. The headless bodies of the foremost Scoodlers kept the others from running close up, but they also threw their heads in an effort to stop the escaping prisoners. The shaggy man caught them all and sent them whirling down into the black gulf. Among them he noticed the crimson and yellow head of the Queen, and this he tossed after the others with right good will.

unka

Presently every Scoodler of the lot had thrown its head, and every head was down in the deep gulf, and now the helpless bodies of the creatures were mixed together in the cave and wriggling around in a vain attempt to discover what had become of their heads. The shaggy man laughed and walked across the bridge to rejoin his companions.
Tags: 1900s - fiction, 20th century - fiction, 3rd-person narrative, adventure, american - fiction, animals (fiction), anthropomorphism, art in post, children's lit, fantasy, fiction, literature, my favourite books, sequels, series: oz, ya
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